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Syria’s famed sweets bringing smiles once again: Syria’s grinding conflict has brought bitterness to producers of the country’s renowned Middle Eastern sweets, but after years of struggle they say business is finally picking up again.
At the “Daoud Brothers” sweet shop in the capital Damascus, 20 workers surround large metal platters, preparing hundreds of wafer-thin barazek, a famed Syrian biscuit dotted with pistachio pieces and coated in sesame seeds.
Syria’s Arabic sweets were once a leading export as well as a must-have souvenir for visiting tourists.
But the war that erupted after March 2011 anti-government protests decimated the industry, with tourism disappearing and domestic consumption nosediving as the conflict ravaged the economy.

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Syria’s famed sweets bringing smiles once again: Syria’s grinding conflict has brought bitterness to producers of the country’s renowned Middle Eastern sweets, but after years of struggle they say business is finally picking up again.At the “Daoud Brothers” sweet shop in the capital Damascus, 20 workers surround large metal platters, preparing hundreds of wafer-thin barazek, a famed Syrian biscuit dotted with istachio pieces and coated in sesame seeds.Syria’s Arabic sweets were once a leading export as well as a must-have souvenir for visiting tourists.But the war that erupted after March 2011 anti-government protests decimated the industry, with tourism disappearing and domestic consumption nosediving as the conflict ravaged the economy.Syria’s famed sweets bringing smiles once again: Syria’s grinding conflict has brought bitterness to producers of the country’s renowned Middle Eastern sweets, but after years of struggle they say business is finally picking up again.At the “Daoud Brothers” sweet shop in the capital Damascus, 20 workers surround large metal platters, preparing hundreds of wafer-thin barazek, a famed Syrian biscuit dotted with pistachio pieces and coated in sesame seeds.Syria’s Arabic sweets were once a leading export as well as a must-have souvenir for visiting tourists.But the war that erupted after March 2011 anti-government protests decimated the industry, with tourism disappearing and domestic consumption nosediving as the conflict ravaged the economy.