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Immediately after the Indian government announced a bill criminalising “triple talaq”, the proposal has been mired in controversy.

Banning the practice of a husband divorcing his wife by uttering “talaq” three times within Muslim communities has been under discussion in India for years now. The practice has rendered hundreds of Muslim women homeless, forced out of their matrimonial homes overnight, with many learning that they have been divorced from relatives, by phone or even by a text message. A recent studyfound that 79 percent of women divorced through “triple talaq” did not receive any maintenance from their former husbands. Despite the Supreme Court having declared the practice void in August last year, activists on the ground confirm that it continues unabated.  

Last week the lower house of the parliament passed a bill seeking to criminalise instant “triple talaq”. If the bill is voted into a law, men found guilty of divorcing their wives through “triple talaq” could face jail time of up to three years.

The reactions to the “triple talaq” bill within the Muslim community have been varied.

As a feminist, what has troubled me the most are critics of the bill saying we should rejectit because it is a right-wing government that is putting it forward. Equally disturbing are claims that the criminalisation of “triple talaq” could be misused with it being a ploy to jail more Muslim men. Read More …

 

Last week the lower house of the parliament passed a bill seeking to criminalise instant “triple talaq”. If the bill is voted into a law, men found guilty of divorcing their wives through “triple talaq” could face jail time of up to three years. As a feminist, what has troubled me the most are critics of the bill saying we should rejectit because it is a right-wing government that is putting it forward. Equally disturbing are claims that the criminalisation of “triple talaq” could be misused with it being a ploy to jail more Muslim men.