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Relations between Saudi Arabia and Egypt’s shift, two previously staunch allies, have recently soured. This can be attributed to Egypt’s inability to perform its role as a guarantor of regional Gulf security against growing Iranian hegemony and its desire to cultivate other, less demanding, international allies—most notably Russia.

On October 10, the Egyptian delegation at the United Nations Security Council voted in favor of a Russian resolution for a ceasefire in Aleppo that would allow Russia to continue carrying out airstrikes, a move that was publicly criticized by the Saudi delegation. Interestingly, at the same meeting the Egyptian delegation also voted for France’s opposing resolution, which adopted the Saudi position calling for a no-fly zone. This seemingly contradictory stance can be explained by Egypt’s desire to appease Saudi Arabia while still cultivating a closer relationship with Russia, whom it views as a potential and reliable international ally.

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Relations between Saudi Arabia and Egypt’s shift, two previously staunch allies, have recently soured. This can be attributed to Egypt’s inability to perform its role as a guarantor of regional Gulf security against growing Iranian hegemony and its desire to cultivate other, less demanding, international allies—most notably Russia.

On October 10, the Egyptian delegation at the United Nations Security Council voted in favor of a Russian resolution for a ceasefire in Aleppo that would allow Russia to continue carrying out airstrikes, a move that was publicly criticized by the Saudi delegation. Interestingly, at the same meeting the Egyptian delegation also voted for France’s opposing resolution, which adopted the Saudi position calling for a no-fly zone. This seemingly contradictory stance can be explained by Egypt’s desire to appease Saudi Arabia while still cultivating a closer relationship with Russia, whom it views as a potential and reliable international ally. 

Relations between Saudi Arabia and Egypt’s shift, two previously staunch allies, have recently soured. This can be attributed to Egypt’s inability to perform its role as a guarantor of regional Gulf security against growing Iranian hegemony and its desire to cultivate other, less demanding, international allies—most notably Russia.

On October 10, the Egyptian delegation at the United Nations Security Council voted in favor of a Russian resolution for a ceasefire in Aleppo that would allow Russia to continue carrying out airstrikes, a move that was publicly criticized by the Saudi delegation. Interestingly, at the same meeting the Egyptian delegation also voted for France’s opposing resolution, which adopted the Saudi position calling for a no-fly zone. This seemingly contradictory stance can be explained by Egypt’s desire to appease Saudi Arabia while still cultivating a closer relationship with Russia, whom it views as a potential and reliable international ally.