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Shouting slogans and holding up placards outside a government office in the impoverished Tunisian city of Sidi Bouzid, university graduates have a message for officials — give us jobs or you will face trouble.

They are part of the spasm of anti-government unrest that spread nationwide this week, stoking another political crisis in a nation in turmoil as austerity bites hard under pressure from foreign lenders to get Tunisia’s finances in order.

It was in Sidi Bouzid that mass protests erupted seven years ago and rapidly engulfed the rest of the North African country, sweeping away autocrat Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali in the first of the Arab Spring uprisings.

Now the young men and women who spearheaded the outbreak of unrest in Sidi Bouzid are back in the streets of the dusty, dilapidated provincial city, complaining that they never reaped the benefits promised by the 2011 revolution.

Tunisia is the only democratic success story of the 2011 uprisings, with a unity government comprising secular centrists, moderate right and independents, but — materially — most people are worse off than before. Read More …

 

Shouting slogans and holding up placards outside a government office in the impoverished Tunisian city of Sidi Bouzid, university graduates have a message for officials — give us jobs or you will face trouble. They are part of the spasm of anti-government unrest that spread nationwide this week, stoking another political crisis in a nation in turmoil as austerity bites hard under pressure from foreign lenders to get Tunisia’s finances in order. It was in Sidi Bouzid that mass protests erupted seven years ago and rapidly engulfed the rest of the North African country, sweeping away autocrat Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali in the first of the Arab Spring uprisings. Now the young men and women who spearheaded the outbreak of unrest in Sidi Bouzid are back in the streets of the dusty, dilapidated provincial city, complaining that they never reaped the benefits promised by the 2011 revolution.