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A cooler Ramadan may bring an easier fast

As Muslims in Saudi Arabia on Thursday start their first day of fasting for Ramadan, they might notice the weather is a bit cooler at the start of the holy month than it has been for several years, at least in the mornings and evenings.

Many will be relieved to know that the blazing hot Ramadans of recent memory may be over for another generation. According to Dr. Khalid Al-Zaaq, a member of the Arab Union for Astronomy and Space Sciences, the hottest Ramadan periods are over. “Saudis last fasted during a hot Ramadan in the summer of 2014,” said the renowned astronomer. “Since then, temperatures began to gradually come down and to be noticeably low starting from 2015.” According to Dr. Abdullah Al-Misnid, geography professor at Qassim University, Saudis experienced hot Ramadan seasons from September 2007 through to June 2015, when temperatures hit 40 degrees Celsius and 43 degrees Celsius, respectively.

The highest temperature recorded in Saudi Arabia during the past 45 years was 53 degrees Celsius, which was reached in both Al-Ahsa and Al-Kharj during the summer of 2015.However, temperatures in Saudi Arabia differ from one region to another. The average summer temperature in the coastal cities of Makkah and Jeddah might be only 37 degrees Celsius, but these costal areas are far more humid than the country’s inland cities.This year the beginning of Ramadan coincides with the spring, when Saudi Arabia normally has sandstorms, ranging from mild, dusty days to moderate or severe low visibility and terrible winds. The minimum temperature in Riyadh is 33 degrees Celsius.

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A cooler Ramadan may bring an easier fast

As Muslims in Saudi Arabia on Thursday start their first day of fasting for Ramadan, they might notice the weather is a bit cooler at the start of the holy month than it has been for several years, at least in the mornings and evenings.

Many will be relieved to know that the blazing hot Ramadans of recent memory may be over for another generation. According to Dr. Khalid Al-Zaaq, a member of the Arab Union for Astronomy and Space Sciences, the hottest Ramadan periods are over. “Saudis last fasted during a hot Ramadan in the summer of 2014,” said the renowned astronomer. “Since then,